All posts by drelectro1

Apart from friends and family, music pretty much means more to me than anything else manmade in this world. Life without it would be unimaginably poorer.

August 13 – Vernon Dalhart

1924

Texas native singer-songwriter/borrower Vernon Dalhart records ballad Wreck of the Old 97 for Edison. It becomes a runaway hit. (Victor # 19427) Aud

Dalhart moved to NYC in 1910 hoping for an opera career, then began recording in 1916. The song about the Sep 27 1903 derailment of a Southern Railway Fast Mail train near Danville, VA — written, it later turned out, by David Graves George — is country’s first million-seller and the first Southern song to become a national success, selling an unheard-of 7M copies.

In the same year he records The Prisoner’s Song; it spends 12 weeks at US#1 in 1925-26. Both songs will be covered by many later, major stars.

During the ’20s and ’30s, Dalhart uses over 100 pseudonyms to record thousands of 78-rpm singles. In 1981, Dalhart, shut down by The Depression and dead in 1948, is inducted into the Country HoF.

▸ MeFi: The first country star ▸ Dalhart discog

See also: Henry Whitter

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ELECTRONIC MUSIC AND INSTRUMENTS – November 1936

ELECTRONIC MUSIC AND INSTRUMENTS By Benjamin F. Miessner.
Published in the Proceedings of the Institute of Radio Engineers, Nov. 1936.

Below are a few of the pictures from this (slightly technical and very scarce) article from the IRE . It’s interesting how a technical person saw the state of electronic instruments at the time. For anyone new to the history, it can an eye-opener about how much had already been accomplished nearly 30 years before the Buchla, Moogs, VCS3’s and others changed the face of pop music making.


Telharmonium tone generator unit


Ranger Electronic Organ, 1931


Trautonium, commercially produced by the German Telefunken Company

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